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When the Saints Go Marching In

"When the Saints Go Marching In," also known as "The Saints," is a traditional gospel hymn that is closely associated with New Orleans and its musical heritage. The origins of the song can be traced back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The song's melody is based on an older hymn, "When the Saints Are Marching In," which was written in 1896 by James Milton Black. Black wrote the song for a revival meeting in Ohio, and it quickly became a popular gospel hymn.

The song's current lyrics were added in the 1930s by Katherine E. Purvis, a gospel songwriter from New Orleans. Purvis wrote the lyrics to reflect her experiences living in the city, and it became a popular gospel song in the black churches of New Orleans.

In the 1940s and 1950s, the song was popularized by jazz musicians in New Orleans, such as Louis Armstrong and Bunk Johnson, and it became a staple in the city's jazz tradition. It was performed in a more upbeat, jazzy style, and it was often played as the last song of a jazz funeral, as a symbol of the deceased's joyful entry into heaven.

Today, "When the Saints Go Marching In" is considered a New Orleans classic, and it is played by musicians of all genres. It's also used as an anthem for various sports teams and it's a symbol of the city's resilience and spirit.

In summary, "When the Saints Go Marching In" is a traditional gospel hymn that is closely associated with New Orleans and its musical heritage. The song was written in 1896 by James Milton Black and its current lyrics were added in the 1930s by Katherine E. Purvis. It became a popular gospel song in the black churches of New Orleans and it was popularized by jazz musicians in the 1940s and 1950s, it's considered a classic and it's a symbol of the city's resilience and spirit.

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